Commercial

Sprung Construction picSprung Construction’s latest project draws inspiration from historic buildings in Denver.
By Alan Dorich

When Sprung Construction takes on a project, it takes a unique collaborative approach to building it. “We like to get all parties involved together early on in the design process, and come up with solutions that work for design, construction and performance of the building,” Senior Project Manager Jordan Dame says. “We challenge the initial concept and attempt to come up with the best solutions possible.”

The company has brought this philosophy to The Ramble Hotel for Gravitas Development Group, which specializes in urban infill projects within Denver. “We have a great working relationship with Gravitas, and have built and maintain the majority of their projects,” he says, noting that the two firms office out of a mixed use project made from 29 stacked shipping containers directly across the street from the Hotel site. Gravitas Development owns the container project and Sprung Construction built it.

When finished, The Ramble Hotel will be a 50-room boutique hotel in Denver’s River North (RiNo) neighborhood. “It’s a very exciting location in Denver right now,” Dame says, noting that the area is seeing a substantial amount of development.

HemmingwayHemingway Development’s Link59 project fills several needs for Cleveland’s Health-Tech Corridor of Midtown.

By Tim O’Connor

For decades, Cleveland had two urban cores: downtown and University Circle, a neighborhood that’s home to several museums, hospitals, cultural institutions and university hospitals. In the 2000s, the city began to think hard about how to connect those cores to drive economic development, culminating with the Euclid Corridor project, which included the installation of a bus rapid transit line and $197 million worth of renovations.

Ridgemont pic copyRidgemont Commercial Construction holds architects, subcontractors, clients and itself to high standards.

By Tim O’Connor

The moment Ridgemont Commercial Construction sets foot on the project site it takes control of the entire process. The company collaborates with the architect and owner to design the building and develop the construction plan, but once the actual work begins  Ridgemont’s takes the lead. It’s how Ridgemont ensures that decisions are made quickly and project issues are taken care of immediately so that the entire process runs smoothly.

“Our brand promise for Ridgemont is complete client confidence,” Vice President Joey Johnson says. “In order to provide that, we need an appropriate level of interaction with the client and the design consultants. What we want at the end of every job is to feel like we’re their in-house contractor.”

LL 390 madison picDeveloper L&L Holding Co.’s two newest projects in Manhattan demonstrate its expertise with complex buildings.
By Jim Harris

Many developers and contractors would likely look at L&L Holding Co.’s portfolio and be intimidated by the scope and requirements of the projects that the company takes on.

“What makes us unique is our willingness to see the complexity in these projects and make sure they are executed in a meaningful way,” Vice President Jeffrey Davis says. “It takes guts and commitment to see these through. Fortunately, our organization knows how to perform custom complex projects, and we receive support from our chairman and president to take this work on.”

Hourigan pic copyHourigan|Clayco aims to deliver its latest project on time with the help of its partners and innovative technologies.
By Bianca Herron

After more than two decades in the industry, Hourigan Construction has earned a reputation for managing complex projects and delivering them to the highest standards. The key to the Richmond, Va.-based company’s success is its commitment to investing in its people, processes and the technology required to build smart – not only for today, but also the future.

Hourigan Construction’s latest project, 600 Canal Place, is no exception. The company has teamed up with Chicago based Clayco to provide design/build services for Dominion Energy’s new office tower in downtown Richmond.

William A. RandolphWilliam A. Randolph is using cold formed steel panelized construction to boost quality and construction speed on the Hyatt Place Hotel and Apartment Buildings.
By Alan Dorich

William A. Randolph Inc. is a National Commercial builder with 60 years in Business. Randolph has developed the expertise to build projects such as the Hyatt Place in Royal Oak, Mich., using leading edge construction methods that meet its customer’s requirements. The company’s experience helped it determine that the best approach for these buildings was panelized construction.

“We believe it’s more cost effective than a precast structure and masonry and hollow core plank,” Project Manager Peter Farquhar says. “It’s the optimal structure that provides quality and economics for this type of building product... and have become leaders in this field.”

ARB pic copySite restrictions forced ARB Structures to retrofit an existing office campus garage for vertical expansion.

By Tim O'Connor

Today's office building developers like to tout their design and lifestyle amenities: how much of the facade is made from glass, what restaurants are nearby, how many treadmills the workout room has and what sustainable materials were used in construction. But for many companies, parking availability is every bit as important as those more marketable features.

A good parking spot is not only a convenience; it's a status symbol – and a revenue generator. High-end office buildings in Orange County, Calif., can charge up to $1,200 a month for a reserved ground-level covered parking space near the entrance. Demand and revenue potential has office developments thinking about how to maximize their parking availability, leading to opportunities for dedicated parking structure builders such as California's ARB Structures. 

Brookfield pic

Photo credit: Jason Dziver 


Brookfield Residential’s Seton retail project features unique designs.

By Kat Zeman 

When Brookfield Residential builds a shopping center, it aims to make it a community hangout. That usually means giving the development some sort of interesting design feature.

“We want our retail developments to become focal gathering points for the community,” says Garrick Fryklind, commercial construction manager. “It differentiates us from our competitors. We build these types of developments with the intent of giving back to the community.”

Seton Calgary Retail Center is no exception. Nestled in Calgary, a city in Alberta, Canada, phase two of the retail development is under construction. The $35 million North Retail District project, which broke ground in June, will feature a distinctive wind sculpture.  

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